A CW Limited Series Reflects COVID-19 Conditions

Like many CW shows, this one captivates audiences from the start.

Courtesy of the CW

Like many CW shows, this one captivates audiences from the start.

Angelique Robinson, Web Editor

In 2016 the CW aired a show called “Containment,” the show only had one season with 13, 42 minute episodes. The show is based on the Belgian show Cordon that aired in 2014. The show follows the outbreak of a deadly virus in Atlanta, and to limit the spread the CDC sets up a cordon sanitaire. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the series reflects the harsh realities society is dealing with. The show is more enjoyable as the audience can relate to being contained.

There are very few flaws within the show. My biggest grievance with the show is the lack of resolution at the end. Viewers of the show never receive closure for how the epidemic ends or what happens to the characters. While there is an inspirational speech that ends the season, it does not truly resolve anything for the remaining characters. 

My secondary grievance is that some of the science is a little messy. The virus mutates quicker than possible in real life. Within days of the outbreak there are multiple strands of the virus being transmitted. Also, when the show begins experimenting with a cure, the rules of blood transfusions went out the window. To receive a blood transfusion both the donor and the recipient must have the same blood type, otherwise the antibodies will attack the new blood, hurting the recipient rather than helping.

The show does a lot of things very well. The characters are one of the show’s best aspects. There is so much diversity, various races, ages and socio-economic classes represented within the show. The characters are easy to relate to and sympathize with. For example, one of the protagonists, Major Lex Carnahan, is just a police officer trying to do his duties, while dealing with the fact that the love of his life is stuck within the cordon. Many people during social distancing can relate to being separated from loved ones. 

The show also does a good job of showing how the government would handle an epidemic. The government takes the necessary action to prevent the spread of the virus. They kept the cordon up and encouraged isolation, despite the anger of those being quarantined, the government remained firm in their solutions, something our governments can learn from. 

The show also does a wonderful job of showing how dangerous a virus can be. The show takes the time to explain how the virus is spread so easily in an urban society, the show emphasizes the spread of the disease through all bodily fluids. A sneeze or a kiss would be enough to get infected. 

In addition to the transmission, the show explains the origins of the virus and how it was created, but that would be a major spoiler. The origins of the virus, the conspiracy and the truth are both real fears of the government and general public. The virus itself is not a major spoiler, so the virus is a manipulated strand of avian flu. This shows the dangers of manipulating diseases because it could escape and start an epidemic,

While the disease in the show is quite gruesome as the deaths involve blood and whole body tremors, it is still an interesting show that combines sci-fi, romance, action and drama. While not all characters receive happy endings, the show is worth the investment. If you are bored during social distancing, it is one of many CW shows that can be found on Netflix.