African Fashion Comes to Tampa Bay

This is a couple’s outfit. Both incorporating floral patterns, his near his collar and hers around her hips.

Angelique Robinson

This is a couple’s outfit. Both incorporating floral patterns, his near his collar and hers around her hips.

Angelique Robinson, Staff Writer & Social Media Coordinator

Tampa, Fla.–On Saturday, Sept. 22, at the AC Marriott Hotel, an African Fashions pop-up show was held. There were also clothes, jewelry and handbags for sale before and after the fashion show.

There were eight models in total, seven women and one man. The women varied in height, shades and sizes. Each had multiple outfits all suited to their body shapes and skin tones.

The best piece in the line was one of the early pieces in the show. This was a one shoulder top made of carnation pink chiffon fabric. The bottom was a long, vibrant, yellow skirt that flowed instead of being skin tight. On the skirt were large pink and orange carnations. The way all the warm colors work together to make the eyes wander the outfit is what makes the outfit so brilliant.

While this piece was more sophisticated, another great piece was designed for a much more casual outing. The eye-catching part of the outfit was the cloak-like jacket, similar to what little red riding hood wore. The hooded cloak had wavy stripes in various shades of blue and aqua, orange and white. Underneath was a black hater top and a pair of black leggings, to make the cloak the center of the show.

There were some pieces that were not as strong. One of them was a knee length dress that had dark and light blue stripes contrasting each other with a shape resembling an over easy egg in two shades of pink scattered across the dress. The shades did not complement each other, and the pattern shape did not make the dress easy to look at.

I thought that the complete line looked beautiful. African fashions utilize colors and patterns which gives variety to an otherwise bland fashion world. The African fashion designers do things that many European and American designers are too afraid to; they use at least three different colors in every piece.